The Beauty of Trials

ankora-bay-easter-island-rainbow-935-1362427568

 

 

Are you in that time and space where …

the nights just seem so long,

the winter just seems to drag on,

the rough patch just got rougher,

Are you in a difficult lot in life right now?  Wandering and wondering …

Why is this happening to me?

This isn’t fair!

How can I carry on?

What will my future be?

 

Much as we hate it, life has its ups and downs: disappointments and betrayals, broken relationships, creditors on the door, lost a job, lost a home, lost a loved-one. For some people, it may have seemed like it’s an all-time low or that the roller-coaster is never coming back up.  Trying times like these leave us hurt, frustrated, anxiety-filled and even depressed.

In the darkest of my nights, tears just rolled down; the grieve was so deep, no words can describe.  During these deepest moments of despair, I cried out, desperately to Jesus and guess what – He met me there!

There and then, He called my name and told me ‘to let go of the past’ and that ‘He is there for me’ and ‘He is enough for me’.  Through it all, I’ve learnt that He loves me more than I can ever imagine and He is always there with me.

So then, why the suffering and pain? I’ve learnt much from these trying times, how to forgive some people and rejoice with others, how to be content with what I have and quit complaining, how to feel for people, how to give and receive love.

Just like there’s no victory without a battle, no rainbow without the rain, no dawn without dusk (and we know the darkest hour lies just before dawn) – There can be no growth without pain.

When life gets overwhelming, everything can seem to crash in together simultaneously, leaving you with no room to breathe. This is when you need to breathe in the air of Jesus – cry out to Him. He will come and hold you, heal and love you, and take you through this season.  He’s been there for me, I’m sure He’ll be there for you.

 

Whatever your circumstances, know that God is working behind the scene, 24 x 7.

Whatever happens know that God has not left you.

It may not be what we expect but then again, how would He be God if He always meets our expectations?

Nonetheless He will bring you to a flourishing end and it will be more beautiful than what you can imagine.

 


Isaiah 55:8-9

“For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways,” declares the Lord. “As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts.

James 1:2-3

Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance.

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Success at Workplace : Passion or Conviction ?

perseverance-conviction-commitment

 

Passion or Conviction – Which is more important for success at the workplace or in life?

What is the difference between Passion and Conviction?

 

We often hear and even use the word Passion.  What does it really mean?

Passion is often used to refer to love for someone or something, ironically refers to ‘suffering’ in Ancient Greek.  Perhaps it is the intense emotion that makes one suffer – sleepless nights, loss of appetite, anxiety, fear of loss …

Passion is so strong an emotion that it oftens render reasoning meaningless.  Besides Romance, Passion is applicable to love for a certain pursuit, such as occupation, exploration, a craft or a hobby.   For example, someone with a passion for writing may stay up till the wee hours in the morning, to pen down any inspirational flow of words that come into mind, an artist passionate about his art may spend days on end on a painting which he believes is his greatest masterpiece ever, an athlete passionate about his sport will train hours after hours everyday to improve himself and stretch his limits.  Talk to someone about something they are passionate about and you’ll immediately see the sparkle in their eyes.

Passion is the spark, that kick-starts the Firing inferno – it motivates us, engulfs us, sometimes devours us.

 

However, I believe to succeed in whichever field you’re in, passion is only half the story.  Conviction is another vital ingredient for success.

What is Conviction?  Conviction is an unshakable belief in something without need for proof or evidence.
So strong is the belief that it holds itself as an article of faith.
To the mind, it is the cognition of doubtless truth.  To the heart, it is this commitment that keeps us going and going, when the going gets tough.
It is the voice in our heart that tells us to ‘Get up”, time and again when we falter.
It is the energy that feeds our soul, with each passing hurdle, pitfall, wear and tear.
Conviction pushes us beyond the boundaries of our limits

Now to me, Passion is the spark that gets me started BUT Conviction pushes me beyond.  When I’m convinced about something, I’m committed to it and so it becomes more than a casual passion.  It becomes something I believe worth pursuing.
Conviction is the voice, constantly telling me that ‘What doesn’t kill me will only make me stronger”
Conviction is my mentor, my coach, my mantra to keep going and going, with the destination in mind.

I used to think that Passion was everything until Conviction found me!

 

This article was written as a part of the “Most Marketable Skills” Campaign on Webucator.

Many thanks to Bob Clary for telling me about this campaign and I feel so honoured to be part of  it!

In case you’d like to see what other writers wrote about, here are some of the other blogger’s input:

Achieving Success in the workplace – What is your most marketable skill? by @cjperadilla

What makes you marketable by @amandastrav

Self Brand Marketing : Social Proof To Boost Your Career by@CustomerRivet

Preparing for the workforce: Why learning to write well is worth your while by @moses_says

The Success of Mimicking by @Lbee27

 

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Maslow’s Self-Actualisation Theory

For the Psychology inclined, dig this:

 

The fulfillment of one’s potential, or self-actualisation is regarded to be critical to psychological well-being and optimal mental health (Rogers, 1959).  Maslow proposed that self-actualisation is achieveable only when basic needs (physiological needs, safety needs, belongingness and love needs, esteem needs) are fulfilled.  According to Maslow, self-actualisation includes being reality-focused, problem-focused, opened to experiences, receptive of self and others and autonomous (ruled by own values).  Self-actualised people may show negative attributes including stubbornness and detachment (Maslow, 1943).

In a study that investigated personality characteristics which correlate with self-actualisation.   Self-actualisation correlated negatively neuroticism but positively with extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness.  All correlations were significant.  Self-actualisation is an important concept within humanistic personality theories.  These theories believe that everyone has the capacity to develop their full potential and achieve self-actualisation (which is important to psychological health).  Hence, the focus is on helping people become more competent and achieve optimal mental health (Rogers, 1959).  In this light, further understanding of self-actualisation will be useful in counseling settings as psychologists help clients advance towards optimal mental health.

 

Further Reading

 

References

Chan, R., & Joseph, S.  (2000).  Dimensions of personality, domains of aspiration, and

subjective well-being.  Personality and Individual Differences, 28(2), 347-354.

Costa, P.T., & McCrae, R.R. (1980). Influence of extraversion and neuroticism on subjective

well-being: Happy and unhappy people. Journal of Personality and Social

Psychology, 38, 668–678.

Costa, P.T., & McCrae, R.R. (1992). Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEOPI-R) and

NEO Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI).Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment

Resources.

Costa, P.T., McCrae, R.R., & Dye, D.A.  (1991).  Facet scales for agreeableness and

conscientiousness: A revision of the NEO Personality Inventory.  Personality and

Individual Differences, 12(9), 887-898.

Dahl, R.J., Wakefield, J.A., Kimlicka, T.M., & Wiedersteik, M.   (1983).  How the

personality dimensions of neuroticism, extraversion and psychoticism relate to self-

actualisation.  Personality and Individual Differences, 4(6), 683-685.

DeNeve, K., & Cooper, H. (1998). The happy personality: A meta-analysis of 137 personality

traits and subjective wellbeing.  Psychological Bulletin, 124, 197–229.

Draguns, J.G., Krylova, A.V., Oryol, V.E., Rukavishnikov, A.A., & Martin, T.A.  (2000). 

Personality characteristics of the Nentsy in the Russian arctic: A comparison with

ethnic Russians by means of NEO-PI-R and POI.  American Behavioral Scientist,

44(1), 126-140.

Hayes, N., & Joseph, S.  (2003).  Big 5 correlates of three measures of subjective well-being.

Personality and Individual Differences, 34, 723–727.

Heylighen, F.  (1992).  A cognitive-systemic reconstruction of Maslow’s theory of self-

actualisation.  Behavioral Science, 37, 39-57.

Jensen-Campbell, L.A., & Graziano, W.G. (2001). Agreeableness as a moderator of

interpersonal conflict.  Journal of Personality, 69, 323- 361.

Jones, A., & Crandall, R.  (1986). Validation of a short index of self-actualization.

Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 12, 63-73.

Knapp, R.R.  (1965).  Relationship of a measure of self-actualisation to neuroticism and

extraversion. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 29, 168-172.

Lolla, D. (1974). An operationalization and validation of the Maslow need hierarchy.

Educational and Psychological Measurement, 34, 639-651.

Luyckx, K., Soenens, B., & Goossens, L.  (2006).  The personality-identity interplay in

emerging adult women: Convergent findings from complementary analyses.

European Journal of Personality, 20, 195-215.

Maslow, A.H. (1943).  A theory of human motivation.  Psychological Review, 50, 370-396.

Maslow, A.H.  (1954).  Motivation and Personality.  NY: Harper.

Maslow, A. (1968). Toward a Psychology of Being (2nd ed.).  NY: Van Nostrand Reinhold.

Maslow, A. (1971). The Farther Reaches of Human Nature. NY: Penguin.

McCrae, R.R., & Costa, P.T. (1983). Joint factors in self-reports and ratings: Neuroticism,

extraversion and openness to experience. Personality and Individual Differences,

4(3), 245-255.

Pettit, J., & Vaught, B.C.  (1984).  Self-actualisation and interpersonal capability in

organizations.  Journal of Business Communication, 21(3), 33-40.

Rogers, C.R. (1959). A theory of therapy, personality, and interpersonal relationships, as

developed in the client-centered framework. In S. Koch (Ed.), Psychology: A study of

a Science. Vol. 3: Formulations of the person and the social context (pp. 185-256).

NY: McGraw-Hill.

 

Shostrom, E.L. (1964). An inventory for the measurement of self-actualisation. Educational

and Psychological Measurement, 24, 207-218.

Spielberger, C.D. (1972). Anxiety: Current trends in theory and research: I. NY: Academic

Press.

Stöber, J.  (2003).  Self-pity: Exploring the links to personality, control beliefs, and anger.

Journal of Personality, 71(2), 183-220.

Sumerlin, J.R. (1995). Adaptation to homelessness: Self-actualisation, loneliness, and

depression in street homeless men. Psychological Reports, 77, 295-314.

Sumerlin, J.R., & Bundrick, C.M.  (1996).   Brief index of self-actualisation: A measure of

Maslow’s model.  Journal of Social Behavior and Personality, 11(2), 253-271.

Sumerlin, J. R., & Bundrick, C. M. (1998). Revision of the brief index of self-actualisation.

Perceptual and Motor Skills, 87, 115-125.

Wilkins, W.E., Hjelle, L.A., & Thompson, M.  (1977).  Anxiety and actualisation: A

reconceptualization.  Journal of Clinical Psychology, 33(4), 1001-1005.

 

Passion with Vision – Howard Schultz

coffee

Who can resist the aroma of a well-roasted coffee bean? Mention Starbucks and everyone knows the distinctive coffee outlets. But the Starbucks Coffee Co. leader was undoubtedly the first to turn that reverie into a billion dollar retail operation.

Schultz was born in 1952 and raised in a Brooklyn, N.Y., housing project. A football scholarship to Northern Michigan University was his ticket out, and after graduating he worked a variety of jobs until becoming manager of U.S. operations for Hammarplast.   Little did everyone know that this young man would start up one of the greatest global brands of our times…

Schultz’s adventure started in 1981 when he traveled from New York to Seattle to check out a popular coffee bean store called Starbucks that had been buying many of the Hammarplast Swedish drip coffeemakers he was selling. There was that great smell, sure, but what caused him to fall in love with the business was the care the Starbucks owners put into choosing and roasting the beans. He also was impressed with the owners’ dedication to educating the public about the wonders of coffee connoisseurship.   It took Schultz a year to convince the Starbucks owners to hire him. When they finally made him director of marketing and operations in 1982, he had another epiphany. This one occurred in Italy, when Schultz took note of the coffee bars that existed on practically every block. He learned that they not only served excellent espresso, they also served as meeting places or public squares; they were a big part of Italy’s societal glue, and there were 200,000 of them in the country.

But back in Seattle, the Starbucks owners resisted Schultz’s plans to serve coffee in the stores, saying they didn’t want to get into the restaurant business. Frustrated, Schultz quit and started his own coffee-bar business, called Il Giornale. It was successful, and a year later Schultz bought Starbucks for $3.8 million.

As the company began to expand rapidly in the ’90s, Schultz always said that the main goal was “to serve a great cup of coffee.” But attached to this goal was a principle: Schultz said he wanted “to build a company with soul.”

This led to a series of practices that were unprecedented in retail. Schultz insisted that all employees working at least 20 hours a week get comprehensive health coverage — including coverage for unmarried spouses. Then he introduced an employee stock-option plan. These moves boosted loyalty and led to extremely low worker turnover, even though employee salaries were fairly low.

Why was Schultz so generous? He remembers his father, who struggled mightily at low-paying jobs with little to show for it when he died.

Schultz has said that his model for expanding Starbucks is McDonald’s, with a few key differences. One is that Starbucks owns most of its stores, while McDonald’s franchises. Schultz doesn’t believe it’s possible to build a strong brand around franchises — although McDonald’s is an obvious exception. Another difference is that Starbucks managed to blossom without national advertising. Finally, Starbucks sells premium products to a fairly upscale, urban clientele.

Starbucks experienced astronomical expansion during the go-go ’90s, going public in 1992. The company has almost 4,000 stores in 25 countries, serving 15 million people a week, and new outlets are opening so fast it has Wall Street’s head spinning. The company seems to be immune to market vagaries as well, gaining 25 percent in stock value last year while the Dow Jones Industrial Index lost 10 percent and the Nasdaq 60 percent.

Schultz indulged his love of basketball by buying the Seattle Supersonics for $250 million. He also handed over CEO chores to Orin Smith so that Schultz can focus on global strategy. He believes that Starbucks is just getting started. “Despite the success that Starbucks has enjoyed in the U.S., we have a less than 6 percent market share of coffee consumption,” Schultz said. “We are in the infant stages of the growth of the business even in America. And now seeing what we’ve done internationally … we are going to shock people in terms of what Starbucks is going to be.”

Asked the secret of his success, Schultz recounts four principles:

“Don’t be threatened by people smarter than you.

Compromise anything but your core values.

Seek to renew yourself even when you are hitting home runs.

And everything matters.”  

Truly inspiring story of an entrepreneur who didn’t give up at anything he believed in.  He had passion for his vision and was determined and persevered to make his dreams a reality.  

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Passion or Conviction

perseverance-conviction-commitment

Passion or Conviction –
Which is more important ? What is the difference?

Passion is often used to refer to love for someone or something, ironically refers to ‘suffering’ in Ancient Greek.  Perhaps it is the intense emotion that makes one suffer – sleepless nights, loss of appetite, anxiety, fear of loss …

Passion is so Strong an emotion that it oftens render reasoning meaningless.  Besides Romance, Passion is applicable to love for a certain pursuit, such as occupation, exploration, a craft or a hobby.
Passion is the spark, that kick-starts the Firing inferno – it motivates us, engulfs us, sometimes devours us.

Conviction –
An unshakable belief in something without need for proof or evidence.
So strong is the belief that it holds itself as an article of faith.
To the mind, it is the cognition of doubtless truth.
To the heart, it is this commitment that keeps us going and going, when the going gets tough.
It is the voice in our heart that tells us to ‘Get up”, time and again when we falter.
It is the energy that feeds our soul, with each passing hurdle, pitfall, wear and tear.
Conviction pushes us beyond the boundaries of our limits

Now to me, Passion is the spark that gets me started BUT Conviction pushes me beyond.
Conviction is the voice, constantly telling me that ‘What doesn’t kill me will only make me stronger”
Conviction is my mentor, my coach, my mantra to keep going and going, with the destination in mind.

I used to think that Passion was everything until Conviction found me!

Follow me at:

https://selfinspiration.wordpress.com/

https://twitter.com/#!/dailymotiva

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Daily-Inspiration-For-Personal-Development/126209916297